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Friday, May 30, 2014

Nashville duo Neulore to bring its passionate folk music to Chicago




By ERIC SCHELKOPF
 
One would be hard pressed to find a band of any genre playing with as much passion as modern folk duo Neulore.

The Nashville group, www.neulore.com, comprised of Adam Agin and William T. Cook, later this year will release its full-length debut album, "Animal Evolve," the follow-up to its 2010 EP, "Apples & Eve." 

Neulore will bring that passion and energy to Schubas, 3159 N. Southport Ave., Chicago, on June 6.

Chicago band Tall Walker also is on the bill. The show starts at 10 p.m. and tickets are $10, available at www.schubas.com.

I had the chance to talk to Agin about the new album.
 

Q - Great talking to you. How was the Communion tour? Do you think you complemented the other bands on the tour?

The tour was great. Our favorite shows were the last week of the run. Iowa was a wild one! 


Yeah, each night had some variety which I think the crowd enjoyed. Between us, Bootstraps, and Busy Living, we all have our different strengths. And I think people really enjoyed the differences.


Q - Your full length debut, "Animal Evolve," will be released later this year. The first single, "Shadow of a Man," has already been featured on the show "Grey's Anatomy." Has that helped to give the band a buzz even before the album is released?



Yeah, it's been a slow build. Which is a good pace for us, and now there's always a few people singing along at shows, which is a good time for us.

Q - It seems like there should be a story behind the song "Shadow of a Man." Is there? 

We all have had that close friend or loved one that has taken a wrong path in their life. It's about celebrating the good in them even with their new wounds.

Q - For people who enjoyed your "Apples & Eve" EP, what should they expect from the new album? How do you think your sound has evolved since you recorded "Apples & Eve?"

It's aggressive, cinematic, reverent, and heartfelt. We pushed ourselves to get uncomfortable, so we used some new textures for this album that we've never used.  



Q - It took the group 2 1/2 years to make "Animal Evolve." In sitting down to make the album, what were your goals and do you think you achieved them? 

We wanted to make something bigger than us. We didn't want it to be the same as the last project cause we've grown as men since then, and one can hope that the music would be an example of that. 

It's everything that was inside of us when we  made it. 

Q - I understand that the band's name means "new folklore." How do you think the band's name describes your music?

It actually is defined as "The beginning of a Tradition" or "A new story." We wanted it to show that we value growth and something that lasts.
 

Q - Folk music has been enjoying a resurgence of popularity for the past few years. Why do you think that is? 

Folk music is rooted in a good story. And that's still what people want. No matter the medium, a captivating story is what we all want to experience.
 
Q - After "Animal Evolve" comes out, what are the band's plans for the rest of the year? Does the band have any short-term and long-term goals? 

I'm sure there will be plenty of miles ahead of us. Other than that, we are just gonna ride the wave of where this project wants to go.


There's plenty of goals. We are big dreamers. We work hard and shoot for the stars, so we'll have to see where the record wants to take us.